The Forest Lake Times http://forestlaketimes.com The Forest Lake Times covers community news, sports, current events and provides advertising and information for Forest Lake, Minnesota. Fri, 28 Aug 2015 14:36:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Stocks’ Woes: Blame Dollar, Oil http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/stocks-woes-blame-dollar-oil/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/stocks-woes-blame-dollar-oil/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 14:01:00 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?guid=b00464aaf157bc4b3ca270306415c2fb Stocks, which neared record levels until their recent retreat, have been flat for much of this year. A host of international worries get trotted out as the reason, but the strong dollar and declining oil prices are at the root of the plateau and then the dip. 

Since about Thanksgiving of last year, the Standard & Poor’s 500 has traded in a relatively narrow range. This corresponds with the end of the Federal Reserve’s stimulus program – buying bonds to hold down interest rates, known as quantitative easing. Other things have obviously come into play: Greece’s woes, the threat of rising U.S. interest rates, weak earnings, China’s weakening economic performance, etc. 

Still, the dollar’s strong rally, as the best refuge in a wobbly world, has hobbled American corporate performance, and investors respond with lower stock prices. The U.S. Dollar Index has climbed 17% over the past 12 months.

Interestingly, many multinational companies have actually sold more goods and services versus a year ago, but revenue was slightly down in 2015’s second quarter, as a result of the dollar’s strength. When foreign sales are repatriated to American soil, the currency exchange shrinks them.

Much of the strengthening of the dollar was over during the fourth quarter of last year. So by the time we get to earnings for this year’s fourth quarter, the comparisons should be more favorable, assuming the dollar stays close to where it is today against most of the major currencies. This might catch some investors by surprise.

The dollar right now seems invulnerable. It has thwarted Standard & Poor’s, which took unparalleled action to downgrade the U.S.’s rating in early August 2011. One would have expected the rating agency’s move to cause U.S. interest rates to go up.  After all, if a bond is more risky, investors require more interest. 

That didn’t happen, though, because of the perceived safety of American government debt – denominated, of course, in dollars. Foreign investors piling into it helped send the greenback ever higher. The 10-year Treasury yield has fallen to 2.17% from 2.57%, and it has even been much lower during that period. (Bond yields move in the opposite direction from prices.) When the market slumped last week, investors, many of them foreign, crowded into dollar-denominated Treasuries.

Typically, lowering a country’s rating normally dampens its economy, or at least is a red flag that a downturn is coming. Our nation, however, has continued to grow its economy, albeit slowly, and the S&P 500 has gained about 80% since the downgrade.

On March 28, 2013, the S&P 500 closed at 1569, surpassing the pre-Great Recession high of 1565 set on Oct. 9, 2007.  Since that time, the S&P 500 has gone on to set an additional 107 record closes or one every 5½ days. 

But big rallies get tired, and the soaring dollar’s muting of corporate returns is taking a toll on investor confidence lately. Now, events that the market used to shrug off get a grim investor reception. China’s devaluation of its currency, for instance, rattled stock markets worldwide. One reason to devalue was to spur Chinese exports by making them cheaper against – you guessed it – the dollar.

Meanwhile, slumping oil stocks are an albatross for the entire market. S&P oil stocks are off 12% thus far this year, the worst sector in the index. After July’s 17% decline in the price of oil, we now find oil just above $40 a barrel and with no real prospect of rising any time soon by a meaningful amount.

In fact, it's entirely possible that oil could decline another $4 to $7 a barrel by the time this summer’s driving season is over. The slower growth in China coupled with the prospect of Iranian oil coming on the market, should the President Barack Obama’s Iranian nuclear deal become reality, certainly adds to the depressed market.

There is little doubt that, as the world's economy continues to improve over the next few years, oil prices will rise, but it may be a long time before they get back to over $100 a barrel.

Our firm believes stocks likely will move up this fall and winter. For now, the twin weights of the dollar and oil make for a tepid performance, at best.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

V. Raymond Ferrara, CFP, CSA, is chairman and chief executive officer of ProVise Management Group LLC in Clearwater, Fla. 

This material represents an assessment of the market and economic environment at a specific point in time. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions, the contents may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. It is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties. Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

 

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Stocks, which neared record levels until their recent retreat, have been flat for much of this year. A host of international worries get trotted out as the reason, but the strong dollar and declining oil prices are at the root of the plateau and then the dip. 

Since about Thanksgiving of last year, the Standard & Poor’s 500 has traded in a relatively narrow range. This corresponds with the end of the Federal Reserve’s stimulus program – buying bonds to hold down interest rates, known as quantitative easing. Other things have obviously come into play: Greece’s woes, the threat of rising U.S. interest rates, weak earnings, China’s weakening economic performance, etc. 

Still, the dollar’s strong rally, as the best refuge in a wobbly world, has hobbled American corporate performance, and investors respond with lower stock prices. The U.S. Dollar Index has climbed 17% over the past 12 months.

Interestingly, many multinational companies have actually sold more goods and services versus a year ago, but revenue was slightly down in 2015’s second quarter, as a result of the dollar’s strength. When foreign sales are repatriated to American soil, the currency exchange shrinks them.

Much of the strengthening of the dollar was over during the fourth quarter of last year. So by the time we get to earnings for this year’s fourth quarter, the comparisons should be more favorable, assuming the dollar stays close to where it is today against most of the major currencies. This might catch some investors by surprise.

The dollar right now seems invulnerable. It has thwarted Standard & Poor’s, which took unparalleled action to downgrade the U.S.’s rating in early August 2011. One would have expected the rating agency’s move to cause U.S. interest rates to go up.  After all, if a bond is more risky, investors require more interest. 

That didn’t happen, though, because of the perceived safety of American government debt – denominated, of course, in dollars. Foreign investors piling into it helped send the greenback ever higher. The 10-year Treasury yield has fallen to 2.17% from 2.57%, and it has even been much lower during that period. (Bond yields move in the opposite direction from prices.) When the market slumped last week, investors, many of them foreign, crowded into dollar-denominated Treasuries.

Typically, lowering a country’s rating normally dampens its economy, or at least is a red flag that a downturn is coming. Our nation, however, has continued to grow its economy, albeit slowly, and the S&P 500 has gained about 80% since the downgrade.

On March 28, 2013, the S&P 500 closed at 1569, surpassing the pre-Great Recession high of 1565 set on Oct. 9, 2007.  Since that time, the S&P 500 has gone on to set an additional 107 record closes or one every 5½ days. 

But big rallies get tired, and the soaring dollar’s muting of corporate returns is taking a toll on investor confidence lately. Now, events that the market used to shrug off get a grim investor reception. China’s devaluation of its currency, for instance, rattled stock markets worldwide. One reason to devalue was to spur Chinese exports by making them cheaper against – you guessed it – the dollar.

Meanwhile, slumping oil stocks are an albatross for the entire market. S&P oil stocks are off 12% thus far this year, the worst sector in the index. After July’s 17% decline in the price of oil, we now find oil just above $40 a barrel and with no real prospect of rising any time soon by a meaningful amount.

In fact, it's entirely possible that oil could decline another $4 to $7 a barrel by the time this summer’s driving season is over. The slower growth in China coupled with the prospect of Iranian oil coming on the market, should the President Barack Obama’s Iranian nuclear deal become reality, certainly adds to the depressed market.

There is little doubt that, as the world's economy continues to improve over the next few years, oil prices will rise, but it may be a long time before they get back to over $100 a barrel.

Our firm believes stocks likely will move up this fall and winter. For now, the twin weights of the dollar and oil make for a tepid performance, at best.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

V. Raymond Ferrara, CFP, CSA, is chairman and chief executive officer of ProVise Management Group LLC in Clearwater, Fla. 

This material represents an assessment of the market and economic environment at a specific point in time. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions, the contents may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. It is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties. Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

 

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New location, same Spirit http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/new-location-same-spirit/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/new-location-same-spirit/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:00:27 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66726 Photo by Jason DeMoe Pastor Michael Waddle of Cornerstone Pentecostal Church is settling into his new Forest Lake location, He relocated from Wyoming due to a need for more space.
Photo by Jason DeMoe
Pastor Michael Waddle of Cornerstone Pentecostal Church is settling into his new Forest Lake location, He relocated from Wyoming due to a need for more space.

Bringing people to the light of Christ is a central tenet of many churches. One area church has done so well in its mission that recently it outgrew its space and was forced to move.

Cornerstone Pentecostal Church began services in the old Sears building in Forest Lake at 24135 Greenway Road at the beginning of June. The church was previously located on Viking Boulevard in Wyoming.

“Simply put, we outgrew our space,” said Mike Waddle, pastor. “We had only so many chairs we could fit into our building in Wyoming, and it was getting to be not enough.”

Church leaders did some searching around Wyoming and the surrounding area and discovered that Sears had a predicament that could work in the church’s favor.

“The corporate -leaders in charge of Sears told the Forest Lake manager that they would have to replace the parking lot in order to stay,” Waddle said. “They decided they didn’t want to do that and instead they moved into a building next door. We took advantage of the opportunity and purchased the former Sears building.”

The purchase was made on July 6, 2014, and the last year was spent remodeling the retail business space into a proper church facility. The Forest Lake location features plenty of room for all current members and also allows for room to grow.

“Since coming here to Forest Lake, we have actually seen a nice increase in attendance,” Waddle said. “People see the changes to the building and the new sign and they are curious enough to check us out.”

Cornerstone Pentecostal Church, a biblical-based movement that places an emphasis on a personal experience with God through repentance, water baptism and the in-filling of the Holy Spirit, has been a Wyoming fixture for the last 38 years. Mike’s father Don Waddle started the church. Initially, Mike wanted little to do with being a pastor.

“I spent some time rebelling, as young people often do, and I didn’t want much to do with the church for a while,” Waddle said. “Then I got married and had kids, and one day my father told me that he needed a youth pastor at the church. I didn’t think it was something I wanted to do, but I ended up saying yes. From there, the Lord led me to becoming a full-time pastor, and I took over the church in 2003.”

Waddle believes that one major draw that his church can offer is the fact that everyone from the leadership team to the member in the pew is a real, down-to-earth, everyday person. He says the church is filled with people who could be your neighbors or friends.

“I am just a regular guy that you’d meet on the street,” he said. “Our entire church body has a real family atmosphere to it and we’re very close-knit, and I think that is a real special thing that we have.”

Future plans for the church include working with Second Harvest to become an official food distribution location. Cornerstone Pentecostal Church will hold grand opening services in their new location at 10 a.m. Aug. 30. The church will also host a free community pig roast Sept. 19.

Cornerstone Pentecostal Church is located at Greenway Rd. The regular weekly schedule includes a Sunday service with prayer from 9:30 to 10 a.m., teaching from 10 to 10:30 a.m., worship from 10:30 to 11 a.m., and preaching from 11 to 11:30 a.m. A weekly Wednesday evening service includes prayer from 6:30 to 7 p.m., worship from 7 to 7:30 p.m., and bible study from 7:30 to 8 p.m. For more information or to schedule a pastoral visit, contact Pastor Waddle at 651-214-2475 or mwaddle67@gmail.com. ]]> http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/new-location-same-spirit/feed/ 0 Linwood talks renovation, police contracts http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/linwood-talks-renovation-police-contracts/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/linwood-talks-renovation-police-contracts/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 12:50:26 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66716 The Linwood Town Board discussed a variety of topics at its Aug. 11 meeting.

Police

The board approved the police contract with the Anoka County Sheriff’s Department for 2016. Residents approved $225,000 to continue with contract police protection at the Linwood Annual Meeting in March 2015. Commander Paul Sommer reviewed several adjustments in the original document for the board.

The contract reflects a two percent pay and benefits increase for deputies. However, Sommer pointed out cost savings with the SUV interceptor squads with all-wheel drive, which are more efficient vehicles. The net result is an actual contract cost of $222,814 for 2016. This provides for coverage in the township for 1.68 deputy positions. Approval was unanimous.

Insurance

To wrap up decisions about health insurance for township employees, the board approved establishment of a flexible spending account (Cafeteria Plan/Section 125). Approved was a $450 contribution by the township for up to half the insurance premium for employees. Any balance of that amount not needed for the premium will be placed into a Flexible Spending Account for the employee to use for eligible medical expenses. Approval was unanimous.

Insurance is offered to employees working 32 hours a week or more. Employees become eligible for health insurance the first day of the month after they have been employed for 60 days. An allowable roll-over of $500 will be allowed into the next year’s flexible spending account. By a 4-0 vote, the board authorized Supervisor Mike Halliday to make decisions with regard to flexible spending account. Halliday abstained from the vote.

Fire issues

Fire Chief Darryl Ballman presented the names of three new fire captains to the board. They are Mike Christian, Captain 13 (equipment); Andy Luedtke, Captain 14 (administration); and Brian Meyer, Captain15 (medical training). The board unanimously approved the selection of these fire officers. Interviews are underway for lieutenants and will be announced at a future meeting.
Minnesota Fire Service has just approved health insurance benefits to survivor families in the case of line of duty deaths for non-career firefighters. To date, the benefits have been provided for families of career firefighters, but not families of volunteers. Beginning in January 2016, benefits will be provided to surviving spouses until age 65 and dependents until age 26.

Board members approved an increase in the benefit level of the voluntary statewide lump-sum Volunteer Firefighter Retirement Plan. The amount for each year of service is $2,500. The plan is administered by Public Employees Retirement Association. Volunteer fire fighters in Linwood have a retirement plan increase as of Aug. 11.

Water management

Supervisor Bob Millerbernd reported that Columbus also wants to reduce its share of administrative costs to the Sunrise River Water Management Organization. The rationale is that less than 25 percent of the organization’s area covers Columbus even though the city pays a quarter of the costs. The board believes either that each member of the organization should share these costs equally or that Linwood’s representation should be weighted, possibly by more votes, to more accurately reflect its 47 percent area of the watershed. Other members are Columbus (17 percent), East Bethel (32 percent), and Ham Lake (4 percent).

Millerbernd also reported that work is progressing on the newest carp barrier in the Sunrise River. It is being installed at the culvert where the Sunrise River passes under Typo Creek Drive, north of the Linwood Cemetery.

Renovation concerns

Millerbernd recommended two members of the Building Study Committee to represent the group in making minor decisions/confirmations related to the planned town hall renovations. His recommendations were Marty Anderson and Joe Dolphy, who are members of the committee. These individuals will serve as contact people for Structural Buildings, Inc. The representatives were named so the entire committee does not have to meet to answer simple questions. The latest committee meeting was held Aug. 12.

Separate from but related to the new building were comments Millerbernd heard from Fire Marshall Scott Smith. He said the existing building needs to be addressed, adding that otherwise, why bother with the renovation?

Millerbernd recited a list of items related to building safety that has been unaddressed for at least two years. These are primarily maintenance checklists to be certain the building remains safe. Among items specifically found not in compliance with OSHA safety regulations are fire extinguishers, which are to be checked monthly; fire cabinets, which are used as storage; burned out lights on emergency doors and other issues.

Millerbernd did not know about the reports until the most recent Building Committee meeting. Whether or not the reports were turned into the town staff, the board as a body was unaware of these deficiencies. Millerbernd suggested checklists on the items, with the inspection dates and initials of the employee beside each date to document inspections. Millerbernd volunteered to develop an action plan to remedy these problems.

In other business, the board:

– Tabled a decision about the bids for the work on 227th Place NE until the board meeting August 25. Bids seem high for the work.
– Received copies of the draft copy of the Employee Handbook from Supervisor Carol Searing. Members will review the document for accuracy and final suggestions.
– Solicited volunteers for the 2016 Linwood Family Fun Day. Those interested in helping may contact city hall at 651-462-2812 for further information. ]]> http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/linwood-talks-renovation-police-contracts/feed/ 0 U must lead on sexual harassment education http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/u-must-lead-on-sexual-harassment-education/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/u-must-lead-on-sexual-harassment-education/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 12:27:01 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66700 ECM Editorial Board

One month before Norwood Teague was hired as athletic director at the University of Minnesota in 2012, the Board of Regents was busy cleaning up language in the school’s sexual harassment policy.

The intent was to ensure that the language of that policy was clear, and that anyone attending or employed at the University of Minnesota would be able to work and learn in an environment void of sexual harassment. Simply put, regents were reaffirming the school’s commitment to a policy that would protect victims and punish violators.

Three years later, the board was reacquainting itself with the language and goals of that same policy, apparently because it had been violated by an athletic director who should have been an example of professionalism and leadership to women throughout the Gopher State, not one referencing alcohol use and poor judgment as an excuse for his behavior.

Just days ago, Teague announced he would be stepping down from his role at the U because of incidents that involved inappropriate behavior on his part. The extent of that behavior and how many people may have been affected is still being investigated. But Teague himself issued a statement that noted his transgression: “At a recent University event, I had entirely too much to drink. I behaved badly toward nice people, including sending truly inappropriate texts. I am embarrassed and apologize for my offensive behavior.”

Already three women have stepped forward to indicate they were the targets of alleged sexual harassment, including one who is a special assistant to President Eric Kaler, another who is a deputy chief of staff in the president’s office and one who is a StarTribune reporter who covers Golden Gophers athletics. According to the women, the alleged harassment went well beyond texts.

What is perhaps most troubling, beyond the idea that it took place in the first place, is that it could have occurred at such a high level and without the knowledge of other high-ranking U officials.

That type of behavior typically displays itself in other ways. Word gets around.

Early reports suggest the alleged activities in question took place in social settings and where alcohol may have played a role. Certainly alcohol can lower inhibitions, but it is not an excuse for unacceptable behavior.

Disappointing. Demoralizing. Destructive.

Sexual harassment simply has no place in any setting. Period. That it continues to happen suggests that some still don’t recognize just how poisonous it is to individuals and society.

Just this year, Cosmopolitan magazine conducted a survey of 2,235 women ages 18-34 and discovered that one in three women has experienced sexual harassment at work. Of those, 29 percent said they reported it, while 71 percent said they did not. Why do so many choose to allow the harassment to go unreported? That same survey found that 38 percent of the time, the harassment was being instigated by a manager. Usually, it is a male manager. Imagine a place where the person that stands between you and career advancement is that wolf guarding the henhouse.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission receives an estimated 12,000-15,000 reports of sexual harassment charges per year. It is a number that is tainted by the fact that so many women, and a smaller proportion of male victims, simply do not report the harassment. And so the violations continue.

At its core, harassment is about control. That kind of control prevents a company, an institution and individuals from realizing full potential. It creates fear. It creates doubt. It creates anger. It creates dissolution. It creates chaos. It creates no positive result for anyone.

The U has taken the right steps by launching an independent investigation of the Teague situation. Two months ago, it also had reason to initiate an internal audit of the athletics department regarding Title IX concerns. That two high-profile investigations are occurring in the same department at the same time is truly troubling.

Unfortunately, selfish, controlling and consuming sports personalities no longer surprise the public. There have been so many incidents of inappropriate behavior by athletes, whether it’s physical, mental or sexual abuse of girlfriends, wives and sometimes children, that the shock for most has simply morphed to disgust. Clearly, this is a small minority, but the behavior still exists.

The best tool available to combat sexual harassment is education. As the state’s premier educational institution, it is expected that the U will bring to bear all of its considerable resources to correct this issue, not just within its own buildings, but throughout Minnesota. It has the ability to truly make an impact by engaging with the public, employers and other educational institutions to find new and improved ways to stop this abuse.

It’s what is needed. And quite honestly, it’s what the public should expect.

And for the 2.8 million females that live in this state, it’s what they deserve.

– An opinion of the ECM Editorial Board. ]]> http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/u-must-lead-on-sexual-harassment-education/feed/ 0 Mainstream Boutique to make Forest Lake debut http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/mainstream-boutique-to-make-forest-lake-debut/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/mainstream-boutique-to-make-forest-lake-debut/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 11:51:41 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66748 Capture

Fresh fashions will be arriving soon as Mainstream Boutique is coming to Forest Lake. Founded in 1991 by Marie DeNicola as a direct sales company in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Mainstream Boutique is a  multi-generational fashion boutique selling apparel and accessories. Current Minnesota locations include Apple Valley, Blaine, Chanhassen, Cloquet, Detroit Lakes, Golden Valley, Mankato, Maple Grove, Mendota Heights, New Prague, Northfield, Rochester, Roseville, Savage, Stillwater, White Bear Lake, and Woodbury. The Forest Lake location will open this fall at 2009 West Broadway Suite 800. Find more details at www.mainstreamboutique.com. ]]> http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/mainstream-boutique-to-make-forest-lake-debut/feed/ 0 Gaga Glory http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/66744/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/66744/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 11:37:08 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66744  

Gaga Glory

Submitted photo
A “Gaga Ball” pit was installed in Forest Lake’s Cedar Park by Girl Scout Troop 53731 on Aug. 22 and shortly thereafter the pit was filled with players. Gaga Ball is a form of Dodgeball that is played in an octagon pit. ]]> http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/28/66744/feed/ 0 Dala reborn http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/dala-reborn/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/dala-reborn/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 22:27:35 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66813  

Scandia resident Dan Lee installs the Dala horse that he spent the last 16 months repairing. In May of 2014, vandals destroyed the original Dala horse that stood in front of the Security State Bank in Scandia.

CIMG0958CIMG0960CIMG0962CIMG0964CIMG0965CIMG0966 CIMG0968 CIMG0969 CIMG0970 CIMG0971 CIMG0972 CIMG0975 ]]> http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/dala-reborn/feed/ 0 Ord 644 2015 Fee Schedule pg 2 http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/ord-644-2015-fee-schedule-pg-2/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/ord-644-2015-fee-schedule-pg-2/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 19:29:44 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66775 Ord 644 2015 Fee Schedule pg 2 ]]> http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/ord-644-2015-fee-schedule-pg-2/feed/ 0 Ord 644 2015 Fee Schedule http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/ord-644-2015-fee-schedule/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/ord-644-2015-fee-schedule/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 19:26:52 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66772 Ord 644 2015 Fee Schedule ]]> http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/ord-644-2015-fee-schedule/feed/ 0 Jeffrey John Quigley http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/jeffrey-john-quigley/ http://forestlaketimes.com/2015/08/27/jeffrey-john-quigley/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 18:56:38 +0000 http://forestlaketimes.com/?p=66811 Jeffrey   John  Quigley

Jeffrey John Quigley, age 53, of Isanti, MN, passed away on Tuesday, August 25, 2015.
He is preceded in death by Daniel Quigley (father) and Carol Quigley (mother).
He is survived by siblings, Scott, Kim Miron, Dawn Steimer, Pam, Curtis, and Timmy; by son, Clinton; daughter-in-law, Crystal; granddaughter, Ruthie; grandson, Otto; beloved dog, Dirty Harry; ex-wife, Roxann Demulling.
Early in life Jeff competed for the Mr. Minnesota title, and maintained a passion for fitness throughout his remaining years. You could find him at rock concerts such as Bob Dylan, Poison and Mazy Star. Attending classic car shows and competing in cooking contests were hobbies he enjoyed with his son, Clinton. Jeff was known for his love of camping and the outdoors, as well as his interest in Duluth (Lake Superior). He was heavily involved in the Long Lake Association, and enjoyed reading ALL the local newspapers. Harry, his dog, was his very dear friend. He spent countless hours with his grandchildren…biking, doing crafts, playing guys, swimming, playing school, playing soccer, camping, thrift store shopping, ice skating, playing at the park, and eating McDonalds.
Jeff will be immensely missed by people in all walks of life.
Special thanks to the support team: Clinton, Roxann and Kim, and to Fairview Hospice staff Becky and Amy.
A memorial service will be held on Saturday, August 29th at 3 p.m. at Mattson Funeral Home, 343 North Shore Drive, Forest Lake. The family will greet friends from 1-3 p.m. at the funeral home.
Cards and memorials may be directed to Mattson Funeral Home and Cremation Services, 343 N. Shore Drive, Forest Lake, MN 55025. Online condolences may be made at www.mattsonfuneralhome.com.

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